The Musicians

 

DAVID HORNIBLOW, clarinet

David Horniblow is one of London’s most in demand jazz clarinettists. He has played at many top venues and festivals throughout the UK, Europe and beyond with some of Britain’s best loved jazz names. He is one of very few people to have performed in the bands of all three of the legendary 3B’s of British Jazz: Chris Barber, Kenny Ball, and Acker Bilk. He has also played and recorded with household names like Jools Holland and Jamie Cullum. He can currently be seen on TV as a member of the house band of Colliano’s Club in the period drama Mr Selfridge. Playing with the Dime Notes gives David the opportunity to play the music of some of his very favourite early clarinet players, including Johnny Dodds, Barney Bigard and Omer Simeon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANDREW OLIVER, piano

Andrew Oliver is a pianist from Portland, Oregon.  After growing up playing classical piano, he became fascinated with ragtime and early jazz in his teens, eventually leading him to study music at Loyola University New Orleans, absorbing the musical culture of the Crescent City until Hurricane Katrina in 2005.  Returning home after the storm, he hooked up with New Orleans expatriate saxophonist Devin Phillips, who had moved to Portland after Katrina.  With Phillips’ quartet he toured 5 countries in West Africa in 2007 as a cultural ambassador with Jazz at Lincoln Center and the U.S. State Department’s Rhythm Road: American Music Abroad program.

From 2005-2013 he was an integral member of the Portland jazz scene, playing both traditional and modern jazz.  The Andrew Oliver Sextet released 2 albums of original music to critical acclaim and his group the Kora Band, integrating jazz and the traditional west African kora, a 21-string harp, recorded three albums, winning multiple awards and commissions from Earshot Jazz in Seattle and Chamber Music America.  He formed the Portland Jazz Composers’ Ensemble, a nonprofit large ensemble encouraging new music by local composers and a corresponding record label, and toured Canada and the U.S. seven times with the Canadian-American collective Tunnel Six.  He also released “Sister Cities” with his chamber-jazz group the Ocular Concern, receiving four stars from Downbeat Magazine.

At the same time, Andrew co-founded and played piano, cornet, and drums in the Bridgetown Sextet, performing 1920s and 30s jazz and stomp with a high energy attitude which cemented the group’s popularity among both listeners and dancers in the Northwest and releasing three albums.  He also delved into the world of Argentine tango music, with an extended collaboration with bandoneonist (and expert dancer) Alex Krebs, resulting in a long-standing monthly gig at Tango Berretin, Portland’s only all-Argentine Tango dance studio, an album of original tangos for dancing and an album of new tango/jazz/rock fusion, “What the Tango?!”

Since moving to London, England in 2013, Andrew has continued to pursue his love of early jazz within the impressive London and UK traditional jazz scene.  Upon arriving he quickly teamed up with clarinetist and bass saxophonist David Horniblow.  A long-lasting duo residency subsequently gave birth to the Dime Notes, a band focused on new interpretations of 20s and 30s repertoire within the framework of the traditional style, and the Vitality Five, a raucous quintet playing 20s small group stomps and jazz with energy and authenticity.  Both bands have played extensively in London, the UK, and Europe, with the Dime Notes embarking on an ambitious 3 week tour of Scotland in June 2017, and the Vitality Five featured at festivals in Holland, Germany, and Hungary in 2017.

In addition, Andrew plays with the Old Hat Jazz Band, the London Tango Orchestra, and freelances with many other musicians and bands in London.  His playing is energetic and authentic, drawing on the styles of pianists such as Jelly Roll Morton, James P Johnson, and Earl Hines to deliver a stomping style which emphasizes the exciting groove and drive which brought jazz to the forefront of popular music in the 20th century and continues to excite and captivate audiences today.

It’s easy to assume that Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet et al can’t speak to a younger generation, but the pianist Andrew Oliver’s quartet lays that notion to rest
CLIVE DAVIS – THE SUNDAY TIMES. UK
Andrew Oliver is almost punk-rock in his attitude about Traditional Jazz and bringing back its visceral nature
MATT FLEEGER, DIRECTOR – KMHD JAZZ RADIO. USA
Andrew Oliver is the quintessential musician’s musician
EVAN CHRISTOPHER. USA
What sets The Bridgetown Sextet apart as arguably the most talented vintage hot jazz and swing ensemble in the Pacific Northwest is their ability to not only harness, but intensify the unbridled energy of their musical antecedents
JON TAYLOR – SWINGPORTLAND.COM. USA

DAVE KELBIE, guitar

Over the last 20 years London based Dave Kelbie has been a prominent accompanist to many of the world’s leading jazz soloists and European Gypsy musicians.

A self taught guitarist, Kelbie’s professional engagements started with the celebrated Gypsy guitarist from Holland Fapy Lafertin and the UK based quartet Lejazz in 1989, a partnership which has continued to the present day with CD releases on Lejazzetal Records including ‘Swing Guitars’ and the highly acclaimed Hungaria’, and with tours as recent as 2017 in an ever growing number of projects. Through his lengthy alliance with Lafertin, Kelbie became rhythm guitarist to most of the eminent Gypsy guitarists of their time including a five year stretch with Lollo Meier, performances with Bireli Lagrene and Angelo Debarre with whom he toured for seven years, releasing two highly admired albums on Lejazzetal Records.

In the world music arena Kelbie has worked with Kal from Serbia, The Original Kocani Orchestra from Macedonia, Hungarian violinist Roby Lakatos, and a number of projects partnered with Tcha Limberger, The Budapest Gypsy Orchestra, Kalotaszeg Trio, and Trio Tatavla. Within this field his groundbreaking UK-based, multi-national Balkan music cooperative Szapora has been his best-known project. The band received much praise for it’s concerts Europe-wide consistently featuring some of the finest UK musicians such as Christian Garrick, Dylan Fowler, and Eddie Hession. Szapora has released three CDs on Lejazzetal Records.

Through the recent project with New Orleans clarinetist Evan Christopher and Django a la Creole Kelbie has become one of the most sought after rhythm guitarists on the worldwide stage. He continues to work in the rhythm guitar seat with UK guitar legend John Etheridge (ex of The Soft Machine), Tcha Limberger’s Trio with Mozes Rosenberg and more recently the very hard swinging vintage jazz group from London The Dime Notes with Portland pianist Andrew Oliver.

the rhythmic rumbling of a folksy freight train
RAUL DA GAME – ALL ABOUT JAZZ. USA
Kelbie with a remarkable rhythm on his guitar delivers an impressive performance
HOLLY MOORS – MOORS MAGAZINE. HOLLAND
Kelbie always provides propulsive rhythm guitar
KENNY MATTHIESON – INVERNESS COURRIER. UK
Dave Kelbie’s rhythm guitar is undoubtedly one of the best in the world
JOHN PIERRE JACKSON – CLASSICA. FRANCE
Kelbie is the motor tonight, providing a strict, subtle pulse – whatever the tempo
JOHN WALTERS – THE GUARDIAN. UK
Kelbie maintains the pulse flawlessly at any speed from zero to a hundred and twenty
IAN MANN – JAZZMANN. UK
Sweet Chorus is propelled by the partnership of the guitarist Dave Kelbie and the bassist Malcolm Creese
CLIVE DAVIS – THE TIMES. UK
The Rolls-Royce and Jaguar of British rhythm sections
SEBASTIEN LEGE – DJANGOSTATION. FRANCE
Dave Kelbie produced such a solid percussive rhythm you could hear why the original Quintette didn’t use a drummer
KEITH CLARK – CRACKERBOX. UK
Dave Kelbie’s rhythm guitar is a joy in itself, firm but relaxed, clearly executed but never obtrusive. Dave knows exactly the best chord voicing for every moment and will add spice with the occasional flourish or series of brisk arpeggios reminiscent of Eddie Lang.
CHARLES ALEXANDER – JAZZWISE. UK

LOUIS THOMAS, bass

Louis Thomas grew up in Devon and originally started out on piano before taking up the double bass at the age of 16, immediately developing an enthusiasm for the instrument. He began playing with jazz groups and orchestras around the local area and a few years later moved to London to study jazz at Trinity Laban, where he was involved in the formation of Old Hat Jazz Band and The London Soundpainting Orchestra. Currently he is based in London and plays with many bands on the London swing scene, as well as playing South American music with Southern Cone Quintet.

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